Call to Action: Grow Your Own Illinois

Call to Action: Grow Your Own Illinois

Students come from numerous social backgrounds, each with their different world views, circumstances and needs. Therefore, teachers need to be prepared to handle that variety of world views. Grow Your Own Illinois, or GYO, understands the necessity for teachers to not only understand the needs of students, but empathize with them as well. Thus, for the past 11 years GYO has dedicated itself to mobilizing and aiding prospective teachers of diverse backgrounds to teach in minority communities.

GYO’s mission has hit some rough times in recent years. I spoke with Kate Van Winkle, the director of GYO, to try and understand some of the trouble the organization has been facing. As of 2015, the organization no longer receives state funding, which led to the closing of all the other offices save for the Chicago office. However, this is not the only problem that the organization has faced. Among those, students have trouble passing the Test of Academic Proficiency, which is needed to be approved to teach. Only 30 percent of students pass the test, of which Van Winkle told me that the students reported either the content of the test was highly irrelevant to their studies or that they had general troubles with their test taking skills and strategies. Other problems include the kind of student GYO needs to empower. Previously, GYO focused on training adults that have already been in the workforce and had interest in becoming teachers. There is a bias to recruit younger students out of high school and in college rather than adults that have already begun their education or have been out of college for years. As such, GYO has needed to restructure and re-prioritize the kinds of students they empower.

The organization has taken steps to start reorganizing. Currently, it is experimenting with a program with Waukegan High School to offer credits for high school students that are interested in a career in education. GYO is also continuing to search for new ways to secure funding for its graduates.

 

CALL TO ACTION

 

Given the scope of the project and the need to revitalize the effort to bring empathetic education to students, Chicago Rises invites readers who are passionate about education to help out GYO. First off, any donations made are welcome. Second, any individuals passionate about educating and want to apply to GYO’s program, there is still time to apply; the deadline is in September. It is important to keep these programs alive for the sake of empowering not just the youth, but our workforce.


GYO’s site: http://www.growyourownteachers.org

For Donations: http://www.growyourownteachers.org/donate

For Applications: http://www.growyourownteachers.org/apply

Chicago Youth Opportunities Initiative provides foster youth, ‘self sufficiency’ and ‘self love’

Chicago Youth Opportunities Initiative provides foster youth, ‘self sufficiency’ and ‘self love’

Since 2014 Chicago Youth Opportunities Initiative (CYOI), a Chicago based non-profit organization, has provided youth in foster care with tools to achieve their chosen career paths and become self reliant adults. Brittiney Jones, Executive Director of CYOI, started the organization after realizing a lack of resources was available for Chicago youth who were not emotionally or financially supported by their birth parents. “There was not only limited funding for foster youth,” Jones explained. “But also there is a growing number of youth that are identified to be youth in care or homeless.” Jones said that her own life circumstances and experiences with similar challenges motivated her to launch CYOI.

According to The Illinois Department of Children & Family Services, a “Youth in Care” is defined as a child or youth that “The DCFS Guardianship Administrator has been awarded either temporary or permanent legal custody (wards), and have been placed by DCFS in Emergency Reception Centers (ERC, formerly known as shelters), with a foster parent, relative caregiver, in a residential facility or in a Youth Transitional Living Program.”

CYOI Co-Founder and Director of Youth Development, Alayna Washington partnered with Jones soon after the organization began its mission to empower foster youth in Chicago. Washington leads a team to help expand the curriculum and she is a spokesperson for the organization. She said CYOI provides academic mentorship, emotional support and assistance to foster youth to help them pursue their career goals.  

In Youth Development sessions, CYOI provides youth the opportunity to reflect on positive and negative feelings they may be experiencing about their personal or academic pursuits. “That is our way of having a community conversation about things they would like to change or be changed,” Washington said. CYOI also assists youth in achieving their personal and academic goals by encouraging them to set specific goals they are responsible for achieving throughout the year. ”This year a lot of our students had goals to improve in their math classes,” Washington said. “A third of them increased their grades from a “D” to a “B” average”. Washington said CYOI is vital for foster youth in Chicago because some youth may exhibit negative behavior without frequent mentorship from positive role models.

Keishona Morris, who became a mentee in CYOI at age 14, said the organization helped her to secure an internship in engineering. She said her ideal career field is robotic and mechanical engineering. Morris explained that CYOI has prepared her for success in job interviewing and what clothing choices are acceptable and unacceptable in the workplace. CYOI also helped her to understand the job description for the engineering roles she is interested in pursuing. ”I would never have had a chance to improve my life without CYOI,” she said.

 

Call to Action:

Rhea Mahanta and The Peacebuilding Project

Rhea Mahanta and The Peacebuilding Project

While it is easy to get caught up in the current political climate, there are individuals who rise up and push to enact change. Rhea Mahanta is one of those individuals. Mahanta, a graduate student at the University of Chicago currently pursuing her master’s degree in International Affairs as a member of the Committee of International Relations [CIR], singlehandedly founded the Peacebuilding Project, an organization dedicated to the academic instruction of conflict resolution and outreach towards afflicted communities. I interviewed Mahanta to get the gritty details of how she pulled off such a feat.

José Porrata- Thank you for giving me the chance to interview you. How about you tell me a bit about yourself and how you became interested in conflict resolution.

Rhea Mahanta- Well, I grew up in a very under developed region in Northeast India, and I saw how conflict took hold of everyday life. And rather than responding to conflict with more violence, I wanted to understand how we could change social structures in order to resolve conflictive situations. All my life I studied topics related to politics, social service and development, and I wanted to incorporate my knowledge at both the grassroots and diplomatic levels. In trying to understand both these levels, I decided to study at the University of Chicago.

So, from what I gathered from looking at the project from a distance, it seems to me that it’s an educational project dedicated to showing the community what’s going on in the world. Is this vision of the Peacebuilding Project correct?

Absolutely. I like to think that the project has two components. The first is creating academic awareness on topics of conflict resolution, peace building, the science of peace building, all of which seems to be lacking in academia. The second component is taking that knowledge and translating it in order to have it impact the community, so the same people that are attending our workshops, conferences, and training sessions on conflict resolution are going out to the community and volunteering and doing humanitarian work.

You mentioned that the Peacebuilding Project does workshops and conferences. Could you go into more detail in how it goes about engaging both the academic and social communities?

Most of our engagement has been limited to on campus, with some social outreach programs we have implemented which I’ll get at in a bit. First, what we do is host sessions on campus such as our launch Workshop Session on Conflict Resolution and Mediation. So, we had around 60 people attending, and we trained them under the head trainer from the Chicago Center for Conflict Resolution who taught ways to carry out conflict mediation. Our second session was a panel on Religion and Peacebuilding. We just explored different tenants of peacebuilding and what kinds of tools we can adopt in our everyday lives. At the moment we have done activities around twice a month, then we had our third session with Syrian refugees to learn about the hardships they had to go through after coming to the US after leaving behind what they had back at their old homes. Our next session would be [will] on the behavior of conflict management, basically how psychology plays a role in conflict resolution. We partner up with local NGOs [Non-Government Organizations] and invite them to present their research and show us what methods work and we show that information to bodies such as the Pearson Institute [for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts] at the Harris School [of Public Policy at University of Chicago] and encourage them to explore these topics in more detail. We also have a steady program of volunteers who go to the Syrian Community Network in the north of Chicago and they engage with the community through tutoring of Syrian Children and linking up certain students with our volunteers and have them mentored in how to apply to college, scholarships, take language tests and the like.

Wow. That’s a noble endeavor the project has undertaken. I am curious though, how did this project start?

This is a long story. In the interwar period, in the 30’s and 40’s, there was a huge anti-war movement in U-Chicago. The president, Robert Maynard Hutchins, led this anti-war movement and invested in a world government doctrine and somewhere along the line that development died down. The Pearson Institute was then launched in 2015 dedicated to the study and resolution of conflict, which made me want to come to the University. I thought that there was a lot I could do through this University in the field. When I arrived, it was a lot of research on conflict itself but none whatsoever in the peace processes by which one resolves conflict. Say, you are studying conflict in Colombia: you study how the conflict came about but not the mechanisms in which peace treaties and ceasefires are implemented and sustained. There really was no insight into ‘how do we get out of conflict’ or ‘what happens after conflict’. I met with professors all over the University and I realized that if a program doesn’t exist, I’d have to create one! This was encouraged due to my experience attending the Alliance for Peacebuilding Conference in October 2017 in D.C. This gave me a lot of insight into what kinds of topics I could explore and when I came back I applied for funding.

Quite an impressive history! It took a lot of research! I can only imagine. Could you give me a bit more insight as who you contacted and partnered with to fund and promote the Project?

We have a lot of partners both inside and outside the University that have shown a lot of interest in the project. For starters, I owe it to the Graduate Council in UChicago, who organized the Think Tank trek in November. I got to talking to different representatives about my project and what they could do to help out. After talking to the Grad Council and getting sponsorship, I got the approval to make the first workshop and reached out to the Chicago Center for Conflict Resolution, where they agreed to talk to our students. The Peace Exchange, whom I was a speaker for, were also invested in the project. We are trying to incorporate their educational models on conflict resolution and build upon them to use them on schools at the south side of Chicago. Next, the Obama Foundation gave me training to start off this project; they had a community training day. I met President Obama, and for 12 hours we discussed how to actually engage with communities and individuals and teach them how to make our project ideas into a reality. Finally, our partnership with the Syrian Community Network has been paramount to our engagement. Oh, and the Pearson Institute has funded our Dinners with Refugees during Ramadan.

As a fellow U Chicago student, I know the think tank trek gave you the capacity to work on the project. As an individual, I’m quite surprised and amazed at the capacity that the University has helped out. Color me intrigued.

Well, what I told you is the rosy side of things. I managed to do all of this during my limited time as an M.A. student. The project will die down if I don’t find someone to carry the project forward. As you know, the CIR’s program is a one-year program, and it cuts the investment I can offer to the project due to the small time period. Also, the Project has no money of its own, and application for funding is done on an event-by-event basis. You need to go through the tedious application process and accept the limited amount of funding the University can give, as well as the venues we can use. We can’t fly in the guests we want due to the Project currently not being registered as a student organization. It’s also a year-long process that due to time constraints, as mentioned, we can’t do.

First, do you feel that there are individuals that can continue on your legacy by using your connections and knowledge to continue the Project within UChicago and outside of the University into other areas in Chicago where there are afflicted communities? Second, has the project considered undertaking fundraising events to be able to fly in individuals to participate in training workshops?

I haven’t even Googled how to go about fundraising. We got selected for the Clinton Global University Initiative, which means that in October, me and two of my teammates will be meeting with potential donors from across the world and whether or not they can offer the necessary funding for our project. UChicago also has offered grants for training public school students, which we plan to use to incorporate ADR training, which stands for Alternative Dispute Resolution. We were hoping to demonstrate how punishment and detention for negative, criminal behavior have not been effective in reforming individuals and reducing crime rates for youth in the south side of Chicago. The students would be offered to take ADR training and learn to manage behavior and emotions, or they would be punished for their behavior. Introducing a program like this in schools would be great for showing how conflict management can help improve society, but we’d have to partner up with the education system and get the green light to implement the program, as well as getting legitimate ADR trainers for the program. We are hoping to get responses to implement these projects, but we haven’t heard back yet.

As for someone who can take up the torch, everyone I worked with is graduating. However, we are reaching to incoming students to see if they are interested in joining and managing the Project. My faculty has been really helpful in supporting the project and are the ones trying to reach out to incoming students. It’s hard to be committed in to managing a project like this in UChicago. Volunteering once a week isn’t a big deal, but even if managing the Peacebuilding Project doesn’t take much effort, which fortunately it doesn’t even if it seems that way, classes and other things take up too much time. Leading the project also sounds very intimidating and that pushes away prospective recruits.

Even so, you managed to create an extremely solid foundation for the Peacebuilding Project, and tangentially you will be working with the project to train the next generation.

Yeah, like, I’m not leaving the Project, just the University. I’ll still be engaged with our partners, just that we need an on-campus insider and coordinator for the project to continue, as well as a decent number of volunteers.

So, having the dirty insider details, what are the expectations you have for the overall growth of the project? I mean getting the project started basically by yourself is an accomplishment in and of itself.

I wish I could’ve gotten more undergrads involved in the Project earlier. As for further plans, I would like to expand the Project to northeast India. I learned about the ongoing conflicts in my region due to my research in Chicago more so than when I was growing up. I really wish the Project could have a more practical approach to conflict management in that area. I wouldn’t say this is my choice of employment, I really do wish to work in diplomacy in the future and work with already existing organizations in different conflict resolution projects. But this project is something I feel committed to and will always take time to work on when needed, as well as bringing the skills I learn to the Peacebuilding Project.

With your record, I really hope to see you in the diplomatic stage of the world. So, before we go, do you have anything to say to any future diplomats and mediators that want to create their own humanitarian organization?

My biggest recommendation is to work with your university. You would be surprised at the resources available for you when you look for them. Of course, that presents the problem of searching for those resources, and taking time to get them, but if you engage with your faculty and try to create something new, you’ll be able to get a project running to address the right causes. The University of Chicago, in particular, really has been supportive in spite of the bureaucratic processes. Like I said, just look for the necessary help and you’ll be on your way!

Mahanta is a prime example that if a human’s drive to do right is true, we can unite people for the right causes.

You can follow the Peacebuilding Project at: https://www.facebook.com/ThePeacebuildingProject/

 

Chicago Students Take Action to Promote Change

Chicago Students Take Action to Promote Change

Between its beaches, museums, restaurants, and malls, there’s no shortage of attractions that Chicago has to offer college students. But what can these students offer Chicago?

The People’s Lobby is a grassroots movement focused on fighting structural inequalities by implementing specific policies and electing officials that support those policies to put the interests of the community before big corporations, according to its website. The People’s Lobby addresses issues from wage policy to environmental justice to mass incarceration and more.

What does this have to do with students? Chicago Student Action is a branch of the People’s Lobby that serves as a way of building bases of students on college campuses around the Chicagoland area. From there, students organize on their campuses for issues that affect those campuses directly, as well as coming together as a whole to fight jointly on policies that affect them as Chicago students.

Chicago Student Action members chained themselves up and blocked the intersection in front of the Art Institute to hold a protest and press conference advocating for free higher education.

According to Dominic Marlow, a senior and student organizer at University of Illinois at Chicago, what separates students from other activists is their optimism. “Young people in general are a lot more willing to question the status quo. They have the belief that things can get better a lot more than older people generally do.”

Having grown up during the 2007-2009 U.S. recession and seeing the toll it took on much of his family, Marlow got involved as an activist when he came to college, where he learned “[the recession] was totally avoidable. That was really big for me in realizing the public sector is run by people who are not representing our needs.” He also explained that his exposure to Chciago’s diverse community made him realize “we have been intentionally divided in order to keep us from building anything sustainable to make a government that works for people.”

Chicago Student Action members on their final day of the March to Springfield. Members marched 200 miles from Chicago to Springfield for the People and Planet First Budget.

Unlike many non-profit organizations, which rely on donations of labor, money, and time from their volunteers, Marlow explained that Chicago Student Action and the People’s Lobby emphasize investing in their members as people to help them develop as leaders. “Our vision is for real powerful communities that can actually advocate for themselves.” Members of Chicago Student Action and the People’s Lobby strive for “an intersectional movement that is diverse and representative of the people we’re actually fighting for.”

Marlow described some of the accomplishments he has seen during his time with Chicago Student Action and the People’s Lobby.

  • March to Springfield: In May of 2017, Chicago Student Action and the People’s Lobby members led a 200-mile march from Chicago to Springfield to fight for the People and Planet First Budget which began with a kickoff rally in downtown Chicago. Once in Springfield, members took part in a sit-in in front of the Governor’s office and held the building for 10 hours before being arrested and moved. That year, the state legislature passed $100 million in revenue by closing corporate tax loopholes.
  • Cook County $13 Minimum Wage: Members of Chicago Student Action and the People’s Lobby disrupted Cook County budget hearings and organized for electoral work to reclaim some of the commissioners districts. Eventually, they garnered the nine votes needed to pass the $13 minimum wage.
  • Election of Theresa Mah: Theresa Mah is the first Asian-American Woman elected to the Illinois General Assembly.
  • Election of Kim Foxx: Kim Foxx, now the Cook County State’s Attorney, has helped reduce the Cook County jail population by over 1,000 inmates.

 

Call to Action

Back 2 School Illinois Helps Underserved Youth Get the Most Out of Class-time

Back 2 School Illinois Helps Underserved Youth Get the Most Out of Class-time

It’s no secret that public schools in Chicago have struggled to meet the needs of their most vulnerable students. Ever since the 2013 closings of 47 underutilized Chicago Public Schools [CPS] elementary schools—the largest number of schools closed in one year by any district in the country at the time—public scrutiny of the school system’s budget shortages, policy overhauls, and overturning leadership has only intensified.

Amidst this turmoil, the day-to-day challenges confronting students affected by poverty can fade from focus all too easily. For more fortunate students, it might be inconceivable that these pervasive cracks in the system and a host of other factors can deprive students from low-income families of resources as simple as pencils and notebooks.

With this chasm between underserved students and their peers in mind, Matthew Kurtzman founded Back 2 School Illinois [B2SI]. “The need is staggering,” he says, adding that 1.2 million students in Illinois come from low-income households that often cannot afford the basic school supplies their kids need.

Originally known as the Illinois Currency Exchange Charitable Foundation, Back 2 School Illinois became a 501c (3) nonprofit in 2010 and has continued to grow in the ensuing years. At the heart of the organization’s efforts is its free school supply distribution program, the largest one in the state.  The program helps kids develop the confidence they need for bright, successful futures, while lessening the financial burden felt by their families. “There’s a whole self-esteem thing that comes into play when kids don’t have the basic supplies they need to succeed in the classroom,” Kurtzman says, highlighting how discouraging it can be for students who don’t have access to the resources that students from wealthier families enjoy. “When a kid goes back to school and they don’t have everything they need, it can be very demoralizing.”

Kurtzman has a long history working with nonprofits. He organized a walk-a-thon while in college that raised $100,000 for the American Cancer Society, and during a twenty-year career in marketing he encouraged clients to participate in community outreach activities. By the time he started B2SI, he had a strong sense of education’s profound importance in society at large. “I just think education is a universal concern because we’re all affected by it, directly or indirectly.” Given today’s polarizing political climate, Kurtzman says, a quality education is more important than ever. “So many of the problems we’re seeing: the divisiveness in our society and the inability of people of different mindsets to have constructive dialogue all goes back to education.”

Back 2 School Illinois’ work to create and support educational opportunities that enrich the lives of underserved students may empower some community members to want to help. Those interested can visit B2SI.org to make a donation or explore other ways to get involved.

B2SI distributes its signature Back 2 School kits (filled with core school supplies children need) in partnership with more than a dozen government agencies and community organizations, including the YMCA of Metro Chicago, Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago. JCC Chicago, Operation Homefront & the USO. In the past year alone, B2SI helped to distribute 34,200 of these kits—over one million school supplies in total.  

Continued expansion is in-the-works at B2SI. Later this year, they plan to begin a financial literacy program, in which volunteers from sponsoring financial institutions will help students understand the basics of sound budgeting and thoughtful financial planning.  

B2SI even has an eye on areas beyond Illinois’ borders, with the recent creation of Back 2 School America. “We’re starting to test the waters a bit,” Kurtzman says of the expansion into other states. “We’re talking with a potential distribution partner in Texas and did a program up in Milwaukee last year with Operation Homefront,” a non-profit that provides resources to military families. A collaboration with Bernie’s Book Bank to include books in B2SI’s school supply kits is also on the horizon.

B2SI’s mission clearly is to step up to help fill the gaps of a poor state economy and help alleviate challenges to our schools and low-income families.  Through its events and volunteer opportunities, B2SI has established a base of dedicated volunteers. And there’s no need to look further than B2SI’s own alums for examples of how “giving back” and community service can inspire. About a month ago, Kurtzman heard from the first recipient of a college scholarship awarded by B2SI, a young woman who now lives and works in Philadelphia.  “She said that she’s so appreciative of the scholarship and what it did for her, that now she wants to help,” explains Kurtzman. “So, we’ve asked her to speak at our annual Kick-Off fundraising dinner in May.”

Call to Action

You can support Back 2 School Illinois’ mission in a variety of ways. For starters, individuals or groups can buy school supply kits (which contain 30 basic supplies) via B2SI’s Buy-A-Kit program, and then pick up and distribute the kits themselves to a local school, church or community organization, OR folks can simply buy the kits and then have B2Si distribute them to the organization of its choice.

B2SI’s Build-A-Kit program is a great team-building activity for organizations large and small, and involves businesses, law firms and community groups buying bulk school supplies from B2SI and then building school supply kits for underserved kids.  It makes for a fun, rewarding experience for community groups and organizations, and/or for a great corporate team building event.

Also, coming up on May 9th B2SI is holding its annual fundraising Kick-off Dinner; volunteers are needed for the event, as are silent auction items. Finally, coming up on April 10th, from 6pm- 10pm, B2SI is hosting one of its “Notes of Inspiration” event at Elixir Lounge in Lakeview.  The event offers volunteers an opportunity to personalize notes of encouragement to be included in B2SI’s school supply kits. Folks can contact Back 2 School Illinois if they’re interested in hosting their own Notes of Inspiration event.

The Night Ministry: Bringing Support to the Streets of Chicago

The Night Ministry: Bringing Support to the Streets of Chicago

      Instead of waiting for people to come to them, The Night Ministry is taking to the streets of Chicago. The Night Ministry is a non-profit which provides housing and support for those confronting homelessness.

      Unlike many similar organizations throughout the city, The Night Ministry puts boots on the ground in the streets of Chicago each day in their Health Outreach bus. This bus, which is roughly the size of a CTA bus, transport social workers, nurse practitioners, members of The Night Ministry’s team, as well as volunteers throughout the city  to help individuals who aren’t able to reach clinics and other service locations that are open during the day. The team on the Health Outreach Bus provides free services such as confidential testing for HIV, Hepatitis C and STDs. They also provide basic medical care, pregnancy tests and provide referrals for medical and dental care for those in need. For encampments these large buses are unable to reach, The Night Ministry sends out a street medicine team to help those in need. The street team visits individuals living under bridges and other outdoor locations to provide survival supplies and connect them to needed support services.

     The Night Ministry also makes an impact through its five housing programs for young people experiencing homelessness. The non-profit’s doors are open to anyone and everyone, with specific support services for LGBT youth and teen mothers. Barbara Bolsen, Vice President for Strategic Partnerships and Community Engagement at The Night Ministry, stated “Success is measured in small steps – almost 90% of former residents of our youth housing programs say they feel confident and stable in their current living situations and more than 60% of Health Outreach Bus visitors say that relationships they’ve built at the Bus have led to new opportunities”. At The Night Ministry, they are not simply lending out a helping hand, they are setting individuals up for a successful and independent life.

 

Call to Action

  • Donate! The Night Ministry is always accepting packages of new white or black adult socks, packages of new adult sized underwear, single-ride Ventra passes, and $5-$10 gift cards for McDonald’s, Subway, Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks and $15-$30 gift cards for stores like Jewel, Mariano’s, Walgreens, CVS or Target. Drop off times are Monday-Friday 9am-5pm at 4711 N. Ravenswood Ave. 
  • Volunteer! Serve a meal with a group of friends at “The Crib,” a LGBTQ-friendly overnight shelter, or provide street meals alongside the staff of the Health Outreach Bus. Volunteer on a Saturday to create hygiene kits for distribution! E-mail volunteering@thenightministry.org or call 773-784-9000.

  • Learn!
    Invite The Night Ministry to your workplace for a “Corporate Lunch and Learn” including a presentation on their efforts, and complete a service project (making sandwiches or creating hygiene kits) with your coworkers!