Matchmakers for Donations

Matchmakers for Donations

It’s that item sitting in your closet gathering dust. Or you find it hidden in a drawer or your garage. Many of us have items in our home that we no longer need. The best option in most cases is to donate the item so it can be re-used. But have you ever wondered if your donation will go to a person or home with the most need?

Fortunately there is a platform that can help with this predicament. GiveNkind directly connects individual donors with 501(c)(3) registered nonprofits to make this donation process more personal and purposeful. I had the chance to meet giveNkind’s founder, Emily Petway, to learn more about their mission.

Petway’s journey to founding giveNkind began in Atlanta. As a music teacher in Atlanta, she learned that some of her students were not able to afford dresses to attend formal dances such as prom. Unwilling to accept this situation, Petway eventually founded the Greater Atlanta chapter of Becca’s Closet, a national, non-profit organization that donates formal dresses to high school girls who cannot afford to purchase them. During her time as a volunteer manager of this chapter, she discovered how much material goods are needed by nonprofits to operate. In cases of small nonprofits, being able to afford these goods is not feasible and can threaten their ability to carry out their mission. For Becca’s Closet, not only did they need prom dresses, but they needed items like clothing racks, mirrors, and chairs among other things. When Petway narrowly missed out on securing a donated lawnmower to help keep the grass in front of their building up to city code, she knew there needed to be a system for donations to be re-purposed for only nonprofits. Determined to solve this social problem, Petway’s idea for giveNkind was born.

The giveNkind platform is straightforward and free to anyone that registers. Once a donor signs up on the site, they can post a list of what the items they have to donate. On the other side, a nonprofit can also post a list of goods they would like to request after signing up. In addition, the nonprofit can explain how the items will impact their organization and communities. “A donor list is available to be seen by nonprofits and a nonprofit list can be seen by donors, so the connection is authentic and direct,” Petway said. That direct connection is important so the actual donation matches are not determined by a third party system, but instead by the two involved parties.

I was able to experience the process through giveNkind first hand when my family needed to donate some baby clothes, detailed here in my story about Cradles to Crayons. According to Petway, my experience is the ideal one in the their system, explaining “We’re of course hoping the item fulfills the need and allows them to extend their reach, but now you’ve entered their circle of volunteerism and potential donors, so that’s expanding not only the nonprofit’s reach but their base of support and that’s awesome!” The goal of fostering these direct connections is for people to get involved in another organization by joining their volunteer base and donating, which can result in reoccurring gifts without giveNkind’s involvement.

Petway’s mission for giveNkind is to grow a community of giving. “We believe everybody has something they can give, even if it’s not money, it’s something that isn’t being used or it’s being underutilized,” Petway said. “It’s some item that’s been misplaced in your home and actually belongs somewhere else.” GiveNkind’s model focuses on the individual donor and enabling them to make the most impact, which results in nonprofits being more productive. Instead of using energy to find things they need, nonprofits can use that energy to focus on servicing others.

The giveNkind platform launched in April of this year, so they are in an early adoption phase while trying to create more awareness of the platform. A couple of challenges that surprised Petway when talking to nonprofits about giveNkind were related to what can be posted and the free cost. She wants to convince nonprofits to post requests for more than the obvious and that they can literally ask for anything they need. As for the free cost, it takes skeptical nonprofits some time to understand that giveNkind is indeed completely free. Petway feels a growing system with more participants will address these issues and earn the trust of nonprofits going forward.

It is amazing that giveNkind is operating with a 100% volunteer base. They have volunteers all over the country, which requires them to meet virtually. A large portion of the team are software developers. For them, being able to give back in way that leverages their skill set is enticing. Petway believes that their structure so far is sustainable because of the low overhead and that they are all volunteers. This fact also gives them credibility in the eyes of nonprofits since giveNkind is a nonprofit itself and not making money off their platform.

The proudest accomplishments so far with giveNkind, Petway said, are the experiences of dropping off donations and seeing someone shopping and using those items. She recalled a time when they dropped off a couch and later found out that it was used by a woman going through a very difficult time in her life. In addition to the donations, Petway also gets to meet and learn about giveNkind’s nonprofit partners and their selfless work. Seeing the impact and gratitude directly is very rewarding, Petway shared.

During our conversation, it is easy to feel the energy and passion that Petway exudes about helping others and furthering nonprofits’ missions. She has a refreshing perspective on how helping others is bigger than any individual and organization. On multiple occasions, Petway said it would be great if people used giveNkind to donate. But if people don’t use them, she encourages others to still use other organizations and take action to make a positive impact.

 

Call to Action

There are several ways one can make a difference with giveNkind.

  • Have something to donate and looking to make a connection to a great cause? Then register as a donor and make an impact with your donation.
  • Are you a nonprofit looking for items that can help your organization better serve your community? Then register as a nonprofit and share the list of items you need so you can meet wonderful donors that could potentially become future supporters of your mission.
  • Are you a software developer looking to give back by using your skills in technology? GiveNkind would love to have your expertise to make their platform even better and to help bring some great ideas to fruition.
  • To contact giveNkind directly, please email epetway@givenkind.org or call 847-802-8977
  • Here’s some parting advice from Petway that resonates: “You have a skill that can benefit someone in the community or organization. Don’t underestimate your ability to affect change. Someone can do anything, however small, to start a chain reaction. Don’t not start because you’re afraid what you’re doing isn’t big enough. Start. Do something. You never know what your impact will be and what that will lead to.”
Grow Your Own Tree This Summer

Grow Your Own Tree This Summer

Have you ever wished you could build something in Chicago that would last for years?

Have you recently gotten out of a long term relationship and now need to focus on something new?

Have you ever realized how boring you are after someone asked you what you do for fun and all you could think of was laughing at memes so you decided you need a new hobby?

We have the solution to your problem!

The Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD) is giving out free oak saplings to residents of Cook County. They have partnered with the Chicago Region Trees Initiative to create the “Restore the Canopy” project. All you need to do is go to one of their pickup locations to get them. You can choose between individual pots or bulk bags – it all depends on your level of commitment.

Never planted a tree before? No need to worry! You will get all the instructions you need once you get there.

 

What is the MWRD?

The MWRD, also known as District, is responsible forprotecting the quality of the water supply source (Lake Michigan), improving the quality of water in watercourses in its service area, protecting businesses and homes from flood damages, and managing water as a vital resource for its service area”.

Besides “Restore the Canopy”, MWRD has several other projects – for instance they are responsible for “greenifying” schools in Chicago. So if you liked this initiative you should definitely go to their website and learn more about them. 

 

Why is MWRD doing this?

The goal is simple – restore the canopy! Besides making Chicago even prettier, oak trees provide lots of benefits to the environment. For example, they can reduce flooding, reduce air pollution and even provide protection from the wind.

 

How can I get them?

There are several pickup locations in Cook County. You can find them in Chicago at the Calumet Water Reclamation Plant (WRP) at 400 E. 130th St., Chicago. If you rely on public transportation, you can take Bus 34 to get there. To see other locations, access their website.

They distribute the samplings every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to noon.

It’s time to get out of your comfort zone and go pick up your oak sapling! Make sure to take pictures and post them on Instagram to brag about your new environmentally responsible persona. Don’t forget to tag us with #ChicagoRises and #MyMWDRTree


 

Still have questions? You can call their public affairs office at (312) 751-6633 or send an email to public.affairs@mwrd.org.
Other important phone numbers:

  • Calumet WRP: (773) 256-3538
  • Small Stream Maintenance (report blockages/debris in streams): (312) 751-5106
  • Hazardous Waste Dump Hotline Illegal dumping of waste into waterways or sewers or complaints of water pollution: (800) 332-3867

 

Openlands: Connecting People to Nature in Chicago

Openlands: Connecting People to Nature in Chicago

At the Volunteer Expo in late February, Chicago Rises had a chance to connect with some amazing organizations. One of the them was Openlands. We hope to partner with Openlands to help spread the word on their mission to connect all of us to nature here!

 

Connecting People to Nature in Chicago

Founded in 1963 as a program of the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, Openlands has been at the very forefront of the urban conservation movement. As one of the first organizations in the United States to address environmental issues within a metropolitan region, their/our work has focused on people as much as on the nature, and Openlands strives to foster a great appreciation among the residents of Chicago for the natural areas around them.

Through the years Openlands has helped protect more than 55,000 acres of land for public parks and forest preserves, wildlife refuges, land and water greenway corridors, urban farms, and community gardens. Openlands’ work in Chicago empowers residents to care for their city by improving the health and wellness of their neighbors, engaging in the greening of their streets and schools, and caring for their local parks and community gardens.

Join the Openlands Community and Get Involved

Become a TreeKeeper, volunteer, plant trees, include your whole workplace or start a community garden. Here are a few of the ways you can get involved with Openlands this spring:

TreeKeepers work throughout the region to keep trees healthy, administering proper care and promptly recognizing and reporting harmful pests. New TreeKeepers complete an eight-day professional certification course and join a network of over 1,800 internationally-respected volunteers. Once you complete the course and are certified, TreeKeepers are an egalitarian network – everyone can get involved right away. It is a commitment to taking responsibility for the care of our city, there are volunteering opportunities most weekends between April and October, and it is a great way to spend your weekends outdoors.

Birds in my Neighborhood® is taught by volunteers at Chicago Public Schools with the goal of fostering youth interest in the natural world. Openlands believes school gardens and birds can be the entrée to connect youth with a long-term passion for the environment, and Birds in my Neighborhood supports the observation of birds in students’ schoolyards and neighborhood blocks. Openlands is always looking for willing adults to help with Birds in my Neighborhood field trips and to assist this great program that is reaching 1500 students across Chicago.

TreePlanters Grants – Openlands believes we must engage and communicate with local residents who benefit most directly from the trees in their neighborhood. TreePlanters Grants facilitate community tree plantings, bringing neighbors together in the community goal of healthy trees. Grant applicants will identify a planting location and gather volunteers interested in helping. On planting day Openlands provides tools and training to all volunteers, and with help from TreeKeepers, will educate communities on best practices to keep trees healthy.

To learn more about these or any of Openlands’ conservation programs, please visit www.openlands.org or contact info@openlands.org.

Working to Have Voices Heard: Chicago support for Standing Rock

Working to Have Voices Heard: Chicago support for Standing Rock

On November 15th, hundreds took to the streets of downtown Chicago, in a show of solidarity with the water protectors at Standing Rock, to take part in the national #nodapl day of action. Across the country people marched to Army Corps of Engineer offices to deliver petitions to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline, while in areas nationally/international without Army Corps of Engineer offices, people organized marches to the biggest donors of the pipeline like Wells Fargo.

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Chicago Gardening

Chicago Gardening

If you’ve ever taken a stroll through a Chicago neighborhood park, you may have noticed small patches of plant and soil with wood built around it; a “mini garden.” These mini gardens are actually called “pop-up victory gardens” and have been sprouting all over Chicago as part of a large project called “Peterson Garden Project”.

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